Connect Emotionally With Your Prospective Clients…

Inspired from an article by Rain Today.

It’s important in all business situations to help people feel seen, valued, and understood.

Here are four areas to focus on to help your prospective clients feel good about buying from you:

  1. Connect – You want your prospective clients to know that you are on their side trying to help them. Be genuine and curious about them. Ask questions about their business needs and be interested in them personally. Build rapport and trust.
  2. Collaborate – Invest your time and attention into getting something done with and for them. Prospective clients want service providers to collaborate with them. They appreciate being involved and will buy from you over your competition if you engage them in the process.
  3. Respect – You want buyers to know they are important. Respect their role and any level of seniority, education, and expertise.
  4. Value – Prospective clients want to contribute to the buying process in a valuable way.

This is an illustration that Rain Today recently posted:

You have an incredible opportunity to help your prospective clients feel good throughout the buying process with you. Stay present and focus on connecting, collaborating, respecting, and valuing them as professionals and as individuals. Go Grow!

Are You Ripping Or Weaving The Fabric…

Inspired by reading David Brooks: “The Second Mountain”

If you are ripping the fabric, your business development efforts will not be effective. If you are weaving the fabric, you’ve got a better chance. So what the heck is this fabric? It is the people, organizations, beliefs that knit us together. Within our teams, individual organizations, industries, etc., we are granted the opportunity to be weavers instead of rippers. The fabric is not woven by leaders from above. It is woven at every level, through a million caring actions, from one person to another. It is woven by people fulfilling their roles as good teammates, colleagues, and partners.

When I treat another person as if he were an object, I’ve ripped the fabric. When I treat other person as an infinite soul, I have woven the fabric. When I lie, abuse, stereotype, or traumatize a person, I have ripped the fabric. When I see someone truly, and make them feel seen, understood, and known, I have woven the fabric. When I accuse someone of something without evidence, I have ripped the fabric. When I disagree without maligning motives, I have woven it. The fabric is created through an infinity of small moral acts, and it can be destroyed by a series of immoral ones.

Relationships do not scale. They have to be built one at a time, through patience and forbearance. But norms do scale. When we take the time to create caring relationships, and do so repeatedly in ways that get communicated to others, then norms are established. I ask you: what are you doing in your own personal and professional lives, within your team, within your organization, within your communities, to weave rather than rip our fabric? What are we building, moment by moment, choice by choice – to get to where we want to go: individually, as a team, as an organization, and an industry, and as a society?

90% Of Our Understanding Comes From Our Eyes…

and it’s important to set time to meet in-person to make business and relationship development efforts more effective. You may find you are able to get more accomplished by meeting in person, rather than exchanging emails or instant messages – where, more often than not, the real meaning is lost. There’s a significant chance of miscommunication occurring when relying on e-mail and/or instant message instead of meeting in-person. Consider the following statement: Amy thinks Mike will succeed.  Depending on which word is emphasized, the meaning changes completely:

  • Amy thinks Mike will succeed. (It’s Amy who thinks this.)
  • Amy thinks Mike will succeed. (Amy’s not entirely certain.)
  • Amy thinks Mike will succeed. (It’s Mike, and no one else.)
  • Amy thinks Mike will succeed. (Mike is not succeeding now, but it will happen.)
  • Amy thinks Mike will succeed. (As opposed to fail.)

There would be no question about meaning if this was an in-person conversation, because the person’s inflection would clarify.

Beyond the fundamental value of crystal clear communication, meeting with people in-person provides that additional (90%) understanding through seeing another person’s perspective. In seeing, we gain greater understanding. With this greater understanding, we have the opportunity to develop a deeper, more authentic relationship.

Asking For Referrals…

Inspired by an article by Mary Flaherty – Rain Group

In B2B business development, good referrals propel your prospective clients into new clients. It may feel awkward or uncomfortable when you first start asking for referrals. However, the more you practice your approach, the easier it gets. Here’s a few ideas to get you started:

Be referable. To use referrals as a tactic, you need to actually be referable. Be remarkable, trustworthy, genuine, and forthright. Deliver what you promise, when you promise. The people who will be referring you need to be able to speak about the value you provide.

Be clear and build a referral network. It’s important for you to know exactly who your prospective clients are and who within your network can help you get referrals to those prospects.

Ask for referrals. You get referrals if you ask for them.

Build confidence. It’s risky to refer someone. Let your referral network know about your business successes and the problems you’ve helped solve to build confidence.

Be consistent. As with any tactic, ask for and give referrals consistently.

Thank your referral partners. Express your appreciation for getting a referral.

Create other ways to recommend you. There are people who cannot or will not refer you, but they may be happy to give you a testimonial or participate in a case study.

Give a referral. It’s one of the best ways to get one in return.

 Go Grow!






Myth – Cold Calling Is Dead…

Inspired from Rain Today

Buyers Preference vs Sellers Actual Method of Outreach

Blogs and articles pressing on the idea that “COLD CALLING IS DEAD” get a lot of readers. Many sellers don’t want to cold call, so they want this to be true. It’s not. The phone is essential for prospecting, especially when you are selling to C-level and VP buyers. I know this personally because I’ve built my consulting firm around using cold calling as a tactic for the clients I work with. It’s one of the best tactics, especially if you are working from a highly targeted list matched to your positioning.

According to buyers in the research performed by RainToday, 70% of sellers connect with them and generate meetings using the phone. This is second only to email.

Sellers who prospect agree the phone is essential, including cold calls.

According to sellers, of the 15 most effective outreach methods we studied, using the phone represents three of the top five statistics, including making phone calls to existing clients, past clients, and new contacts.

Both buyers and sellers agree: cold calling works and it’s still one of the most effective ways to generate initial sales conversations.

 






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