90% Of Our Understanding Comes From Our Eyes…

and it’s important to set time to meet in-person to make business and relationship development efforts more effective. You may find you are able to get more accomplished by meeting in person, rather than exchanging emails or instant messages – where, more often than not, the real meaning is lost. There’s a significant chance of miscommunication occurring when relying on e-mail and/or instant message instead of meeting in-person. Consider the following statement: Amy thinks Mike will succeed.  Depending on which word is emphasized, the meaning changes completely:

  • Amy thinks Mike will succeed. (It’s Amy who thinks this.)
  • Amy thinks Mike will succeed. (Amy’s not entirely certain.)
  • Amy thinks Mike will succeed. (It’s Mike, and no one else.)
  • Amy thinks Mike will succeed. (Mike is not succeeding now, but it will happen.)
  • Amy thinks Mike will succeed. (As opposed to fail.)

There would be no question about meaning if this was an in-person conversation, because the person’s inflection would clarify.

Beyond the fundamental value of crystal clear communication, meeting with people in-person provides that additional (90%) understanding through seeing another person’s perspective. In seeing, we gain greater understanding. With this greater understanding, we have the opportunity to develop a deeper, more authentic relationship.

Asking For Referrals…

Inspired by an article by Mary Flaherty – Rain Group

In B2B business development, good referrals propel your prospective clients into new clients. It may feel awkward or uncomfortable when you first start asking for referrals. However, the more you practice your approach, the easier it gets. Here’s a few ideas to get you started:

Be referable. To use referrals as a tactic, you need to actually be referable. Be remarkable, trustworthy, genuine, and forthright. Deliver what you promise, when you promise. The people who will be referring you need to be able to speak about the value you provide.

Be clear and build a referral network. It’s important for you to know exactly who your prospective clients are and who within your network can help you get referrals to those prospects.

Ask for referrals. You get referrals if you ask for them.

Build confidence. It’s risky to refer someone. Let your referral network know about your business successes and the problems you’ve helped solve to build confidence.

Be consistent. As with any tactic, ask for and give referrals consistently.

Thank your referral partners. Express your appreciation for getting a referral.

Create other ways to recommend you. There are people who cannot or will not refer you, but they may be happy to give you a testimonial or participate in a case study.

Give a referral. It’s one of the best ways to get one in return.

 Go Grow!






Myth – Cold Calling Is Dead…

Inspired from Rain Today

Buyers Preference vs Sellers Actual Method of Outreach

Blogs and articles pressing on the idea that “COLD CALLING IS DEAD” get a lot of readers. Many sellers don’t want to cold call, so they want this to be true. It’s not. The phone is essential for prospecting, especially when you are selling to C-level and VP buyers. I know this personally because I’ve built my consulting firm around using cold calling as a tactic for the clients I work with. It’s one of the best tactics, especially if you are working from a highly targeted list matched to your positioning.

According to buyers in the research performed by RainToday, 70% of sellers connect with them and generate meetings using the phone. This is second only to email.

Sellers who prospect agree the phone is essential, including cold calls.

According to sellers, of the 15 most effective outreach methods we studied, using the phone represents three of the top five statistics, including making phone calls to existing clients, past clients, and new contacts.

Both buyers and sellers agree: cold calling works and it’s still one of the most effective ways to generate initial sales conversations.

 






Recognizing Listening As A Necessary Skill To Establish And Grow Business Relationships…

Inspired by a post from Stacey Hanke, Founder of Stacey Hanke Inc. and Author of Influence Redefined

Most people consider themselves to be good listeners, finding it hard to admit otherwise. We know listening is vital to building strong relationships with coworkers, managers, clients, and leadership. In fact, it is considered to be the single most important communication skill necessary, valued more highly than speaking, in the business world.

We spend between 70 to 80% of each day engaged in communication, with over half that time devoted to listening, and yet we struggle to do it effectively. Because we hear speech at a rate of 500-1,000 words per minute, and only speak 125-175 words per minute, we become easily bored, distracted and inattentive.

By recognizing listening as a skill necessary to establish and grow business relationships, we can begin prioritizing our need to do it well. Here are eight ways to immediately stop talking and start listening:

1. “My turn, my turn!”

Admit it, when others start speaking you immediately begin thinking of what to say next. Speaking may be considered relatively easy by most, many fail to effectively listen. Stop competing for your turn to talk and simply listen. Deliberately concentrate your focus on the speaker, keeping natural eye contact, and tune into their facial expressions and body language. Clear your mind and focus on the message until they have completed their thoughts.

2. “Wait, let me get that.”

Few things are as inconsiderate or hard to ignore like the distraction of a device; yet, many of us are guilty of giving in to its demand for our attention. Even when we try, it is next to impossible to concentrate on someone speaking when the phone sitting next to us is buzzing with text messages, alerts, emails, and phone calls. If you’re in a conversation, silence your device. Give your respect to those speaking by removing any distractions that may compete with their message.

3. “I see. Go on.”

Active listening is more than just hearing what someone says, it’s about the desire to understand what someone is trying to convey. Mindtools — a career skills development group – reported that people only remember between 25-50% of what is heard, meaning we pay attention to less than half of what someone says. By using words of encouragement such as “I see” and “Go on,” we can boost our ability to retain conversational details. This style of interaction also promotes the conversation often revealing more details than the speaker originally considered sharing.

4. Silence is golden.

It’s important to get comfortable with silence in your conversations. Many of us are uncomfortable with quiet pauses and rush to fill the dead space. Instead, allow the silence to permeate the moment and give time for the speaker to transition between topics. Pausing between the end of their thought and the beginning of yours allows time for you to formulate a clear and concise response.

5. “What I understand you to say is … ”

Imagine the number of times we could prevent miscommunication if we took a moment to paraphrase what we thought of the speaker to say. Paraphrasing helps create an opportunity for clarification if the speaker feels they were misunderstood. It provides them another chance to communicate their thoughts and ensure everyone is on the same page.

6. “How long has this been occurring?”

Open-ended questions have power. They have the power to explore the conversation and shed light on facts that are missing. Consider how much more information you can learn if you were to ask a venting coworker “How long as this been going on,” versus “Has this been going on long?” A simple yes or no response doesn’t provide the speaker an opportunity to elaborate, but the open-ended question invites them to continue in detail.

7. “What are you saying without saying?”

While many of our conversations may be casual, some of them serve a purpose not so easily heard. Listening for the intent of someone speaking can help reveal the reason they are sharing with you in the first place. By listening intently, you can witness whether their body language, gestures, and facial expressions match their message. If not, listen for their intent. Read between the lines and identify what they are saying without saying.

8. “Just checking in on you.”

Empathy is powerful. Just because a conversation has ended doesn’t mean the situation has. If you want to build a trusting relationship with your coworkers, work on your ability to demonstrate empathy. Empathy expresses compassion and understanding for the conversation shared. Whether you are empathetic throughout the conversation or after, bringing this level of engagement to the conversation will further your relationship and create a degree of mutual respect. 

By mindfully listening to coworkers and colleagues, you will begin establishing relationships built on trust and respect. The credibility you earn as your peers’ listener will help you become their partner in success.






Leave A Strong First Impression…

Research shows most people decide whether or not they like you, and whether or not they will do business with you, within the first few seconds (yes seconds!) of meeting you. They then spend the rest of the conversation internally justifying their initial reaction. This may sound terrifying, but by knowing this you can take advantage of it to make huge gains in your likeability. First impressions are tied intimately to positive body language. Ensure that your first impression is a good one by paying attention to the following:

Maintain a strong and straight, yet flexible posture. You are a human, not a statue.

Offer a firm and gracious handshake.

Smile and maintain good eye contact.

Open your shoulders to the person you are sharing a conversation with.

Listen 2x more than you talk – be curious about them and their world.

Go Grow!

 






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